Autumn/Winter Releases From Immanion Press

Autumn can be smelled in the air now, and the autumn equinox is only three weeks away. Time to announce our end of year publications.

September

We’ll be releasing a new fiction title in September – ‘The Company of Birds’ by Nerine Dorman. Reflecting the author’s fascination with birds, and owls in particular, this is a literary fantasy, with intriguing characters and a touch of grimdark in the plot. A beautifully rendered alternate world, where fire magic is outlawed, and political factions vie for power.

Cover Text:

“Sometimes a hero must burn all she holds dear.

Unrest brews in the city-state of Uitenbach, but its magi continue their work, even though the world outside the hallowed grounds of their academy seems to be tearing itself to pieces.

Newly divorced and still smarting from her philandering ex-husband’s rejection, Maga Liese ten Haven doesn’t want to draw attention to herself. When the mysterious Atroyan tribesman Malagai reveals to Liese that she is the heir to a forbidden magical legacy, she is thrust into a conspiracy that may foment a civil war. If she fails, her magic will consume her.

But what if the only way to right the wrongs her people have done to the Atroyan nation is to sacrifice everything?”

Book Details:
ISBN: 978-1-912815-03-6
P0154
Price: £12.99, $16.99, E15.99
368 pages

October

This month we’ll publish the next in our series of Tanith Lee rare story collections ‘A Wolf at the Door’.

Wolf at the Door Blog

Cover Text:

Tanith Lee, one of the world’s best writers of fantasy and horror, wrote hundreds of stories within her lifetime, spanning many genres. In this collection are thirteen tales, most of which only appeared in magazines or rare anthologies.

‘A wolf at the door’ implies hidden threat – until the door is open, we don’t really know what’s out there. It can also refer to misfortune, seen coming from a distance. And now the beast is upon you, scratching at the wood, its hot breath steaming on the step. Will you survive the encounter? Will the dawn save you – that good fortune you’ve longed for? The wolf might also be a metaphor for madness, another kind of predator that may creep towards a person unseen. Perhaps, once the door is opened, what you might have thought to be a threat turns out to be something else entirely. But of course, it can also be a werewolf…

Tanith enjoyed playing with genres and their tropes, and the stories in this collection range in mood and tone, from the light-hearted to the terrifying, the whimsical to the unsettling. A superb introduction to her work for the newcomer and a treasure trove for her enthusiasts.

With an introduction and illustrations by Storm Constantine and cover art by John Kaiine. Cover design by Danielle Lainton.

Contents: Huzdra, A Wolf at the Door, Venus Rising on Water, The Puma’s Daughter, The Return of Berenice, Sea Warg, Table Manners, The Werewolf, The Janfia Tree, Tiger I, Pinewood, Nightshade, Why Light?

Book Details:
ISBN: 978-1-912815-04-3
IP0155
296 pages
Price: £11.99 $15.99 E13.99

Also in October, Cornelia Benavidez’s next title ‘Petition for a Tomorrow: A Journey for Victor’ will be published. This follows on from her works ‘Victor H. Anderson: An American Shaman’, which explored the teachings and history of the creator of the Feri tradition, and ‘Transpiration’, a book of Cornelia’s poems that also included stories of her childhood and her discovery of alternative spirituality in 1970s San Francisco.

Petition for a Tomorrow’ tells the tale of Cornelia’s quest, as a young woman in 1986, to discover the spirits of Hawaii, which her mentor Victor intimated were a vital part of her spiritual growth. She and the friend who accompanied her to the mystical Islands had many adventures as they travelled around the sacred sites – a few of which were quite hair-raising! But Cornelia’s purpose was always to seek out the ancient gods of the Islands and ask for their help in preserving our world. The journey was filled with lessons and symbols, ending in a transforming experience at the mouth of a volcano.

A fascinating read, and a snapshot of an era, ‘Petition for a Tomorrow’ captures the spirit of emerging paganism in the world. Cover art by Peter Hollinghurst. (Cover art to be revealed soon.)

Book Details:
ISBN: 978-1-912241-12-5
MB0204
Price: £10.99, $13.99, E12.99
212 pages

December

Storm Constantine’s new novel will be released this month. ‘Breathe, my Shadow’ is a stand-alone Wraeththu mythos story set in the Almagabran town of Ferelithia. Wraeththu enthusiasts will know this place as a significant site in the history of Pellaz, who became Tigron of the Gelaming tribe. But that was decades ago. Now, it is the archetypal party destination, thronged with hedonistic tourists, vibrant with events and concerts. It seems nothing can touch its carefree atmosphere of celebration and indulgence. Even its local dehar, Kelosanya, is named for the madness of erotic desire. But Ferelithia wasn’t always a place of light and fun. It was built on blood sacrifice and the darkest of magics. Very few Ferelithians know exactly how their tribe wrested the town from the surviving humans in the area, and those who do know must keep the details secret. But the truth has a habit of rising from where it was buried.

The arrival in Ferelithia of a very strange har, who has a dark history of his own, sets events in motion. The Pale Ones begin to walk, and the mysterious Pard Witch begins to haunt the town and its inhabitants. His influence stretches far, touching the lives of four hara who were once in a Ferelithian band together. In far off Megalithica a rich and successful musician named Amorel is subjected to horrifying hallucinations. In Alba Sulh, the drummer Pharis finds his community threatened by a nebulous enemy that can only derive from his own past. Rue, Tigrina of Immanion, once a singer in the band, has unsettling encounters with a har who looks like somehar he knew a long time ago – and believed dead. Karn, the erstwhile guitarist, is now High Municiphar of Ferelithia – and he, of all of them, has the most secrets to control and contain. But until somehar can say for sure the threats derive from the past or from an unexpected current influence, they can’t protect themselves or their town. Whatever the consequences, a very dark history has to be faced.

The novel began life as a story in the ‘Para Spectral’ anthology, but Storm has taken it off in several different directions, with an additional cast of characters both old and new. She says:

‘When I wrote the (not so) short story, there was so much more I wanted to tell. I felt it simply finished at the end of a chapter rather than concluded the plot. This can often happen with my stories, and most often the urge to go further with them withers after a few weeks and I’m happy to leave them as they are. However, this one refused to lie down and do as it was told. Ferelithia fascinates me. It’s like the Ibiza of the Wraeththu world, but as with that island of hedonistic pleasure in our real world, Ferelithia has a mottled past, stretching back through history to the days of the ancient gods. (The captivating new documentary by Julien Temple about Ibiza’s history and culture was timely and inspirational, as I was able to watch it during the latter stages of writing the book.) ‘Breathe, my Shadow’ makes the characters face who and what they were. The past left them broken, and while some have recovered and made new lives for themselves others have not. So it isn’t simply a mystery, but a tale about atonement, recovery, forgiveness and acceptance. It is, however, still a ghost story.’

Cover art by Ruby. No cover yet, but here’s one of characters from the novel taken from the cover of Para Spectral.

Leupardra Web

We’ll also be releasing Bill Duvendack’s next book in December. ‘Psychic Protection’ follows on from his popular titles, ‘Vocal Magick’ and ‘Spirit Relations’.

Bill Duvendack new web

Cover text:

So, why another book on Psychic Protection? Hasn’t there been enough written on the subject? Yes, there has been a lot written about it over the years, but what sets Psychic Protection apart from the others is that it is practical and encompasses more than your usual protection techniques.

In addition to standard protection techniques such as specialized stones and herbs, you will find other more adaptable tools, and all of this information will be tempered with common sense. Beginning with the human body and the necessity of taking care of one’s self, Psychic Protection takes a comprehensive look at what you can do to protect yourself psychically speaking, and it is centered on sharing information that requires no particular tools. In addition to discussing the human body, a look at astral impressions, thoughtforms, and reading body language are included in this tome. The book itself is split into sections that correspond to the four classical elements of the Western Esoteric Tradition, and therefore time will be given to emotional and physical health as well as the more commonly known tools such as stones, oils, herbs, and certain rituals. For the novice or the experienced, this gives you what you need to protect yourself, even when you may not have your favorite tools on hand.

More details to follow for the December titles nearer to release dates.

 

Interview with Author Fiona McGavin

Fiona McGavin bw

IP: When did you begin creating stories? Were you an imaginative child? What are your earliest memories of writing/being creative?

FM: I don’t remember a time when I wasn’t making up stories. I remember being about 3 or 4 years old and being in bed making up a story in my head about a boy called Navy Blue. Apart from having to write stories at school, I probably started writing them down when I was about 12 years old. Paper was like gold dust in our house, and I wrote a long involved school story on a wodge of computer printout paper my Dad gave me. When I was a little older, I used to spend my pocket money on refill pads from Woolworths. I wrote an Adrian Mole type diary thing with pictures that was very roughly based on my family. It was the first thing I let them read and it made them laugh – I think that was the first time I thought I might be good at writing. Sadly, I didn’t keep that piece of writing. Sometime after that I must have started writing fantasy, but I don’t remember exactly when.

IP: What influences you most creatively? What were your original influences?

FM: All sorts of things influence me – books, TV programmes, quite often song lyrics or lines from poetry. I have a habit of scrolling through Pinterest looking for images to inspire me and I usually listen to music when I’m writing. Sometimes, a character from a film or TV will spark something.

I’ve always been intrigued by villains and anti-heroes. There’s a bit of a joke in my family that when I was little, the child catcher from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was my favourite character and I felt sorry for him and that he was misunderstood

I read a lot of school stories as a child – the Chalet School books in particular and I think what I liked about them was the drama in the interactions between the schoolgirls and I think this has carried over into my writing. I remember watching Star Wars and Return of the Jedi and being completely enthralled but again, I think it was the characters more than the story that appealed to me. I think a lot of people say this, but once I read The Lord of the Rings, I knew I wanted to write a fantasy novel. I didn’t even understand it properly the first time round, but it definitely influenced me (the films too) if only to get me reading more fantasy novels.

As a teenager, I read a lot of anthologies of ghost stories. I took them out of the school library, and I think there was a series of them called something like Spectre 1 – 4. I read a lot of teen novels around that time. There was a book called ‘The Outsiders’ by S E Hinton that I loved so much I stole it from the school library. I still read the ‘The Chocolate War’ and ‘Beyond the Chocolate War’ by Robert Cormier every couple of years because I think the way he depicts the misuse of power is very powerful. Those books were probably the first I read where the good guys didn’t win, and the villain wasn’t punished.

When I started writing more seriously – in my early 20’s – I was reading more and more fantasy and writing more of it too. I read a lot of Anne Rice and at the time her lush, descriptive style appealed to me as well as her immortal characters. I was also reading Tad Williams’ epic fantasies and Storm Constantine’s Wraeththu trilogy and out of this mish mash came A Dream and a Lie. It also came about because I couldn’t understand why anyone (even an evil over lord) would want to live in Mordor – it’s horrible and uncomfortable there and orcs are not nice people to have around. That got me thinking of alternatives. So, the Big Bad in A Dream and a Lie lives somewhere that’s quite a bit nicer than some of the places where the good guys live.

ADreamAndALieOriginal Cover Illustration for ‘A Dream and a Lie’ Omnibus
by Ruby

The Wraeththu trilogy was important to my writing because I’d never read anything like it. I loved the characters, the plot and the setting but I also liked the way that it treated with gender. I’d been writing male characters that spoke and behaved in a way I felt was more female and I thought this was a fault with my writing. Reading the Wraeththu books showed me that there were ways round this, things I could do with the building of my worlds and without changing my characters’ personalities

IP: Several of your stories concern life in a humdrum office. Clearly, you have worked in such an office, and have experienced the pitfalls! Can you expand upon your inspirations for these stories?

FM: I’ve worked in a lot of offices, so I guess I’m just writing what I know. There are a lot of small dramas that go on at work and people get very territorial over desks and chairs and stationery. I’ve witnessed arguments over some ridiculous things and seen grown women revert to schoolgirls over whether to have a window open or closed (this resulted in someone very pointedly wearing a winter coat in the office in the height of summer.

There’s a lot of backstabbing and some quite despicable behaviour that goes on but is somehow condoned because it happens at work. In my story ‘Cosmic Ordering for Vampires’ the vampire kills someone because she gets given his desk at the window because she’s more senior than he is. This happened to me in one of the jobs I had, and it just seemed utterly petty to me. I didn’t complain, but I didn’t like it much and I may have harboured some revenge fantasies that have come out in this story! In that same office, the girl I was moved next to, very pointedly moved all her stuff to another desk so she wouldn’t have to sit next to me, and one evening someone took my monitor and chair and then when I came in the next morning I was told ‘no one here would do that’ when my empty desk made it obvious they had. They really didn’t like me there.

In one team I worked in we did a lot of overtime in the evenings and at the weekends. A couple of times, I got there before 8 am on a Sunday morning and there was hardly anyone else in the massive building. It was quite eerie. The lights were on a motion sensor so only came on when you walked under them, past all those empty desks with papers and coffee mugs left on them as if their occupants were expected back at any minute. There were lots of creaking noises and any footsteps from upstairs were amplified because it was so quiet. It was always the same group of people doing overtime and we got to be quite a close knit group. At some point, I thought I’d worked out how to defraud the bank and I was pretty sure at least one of my colleagues would have helped me. So, from all that, I got the ideas for ‘Cosmic Ordering’, ‘The Lottery Lady’ and ‘We Are Not Who We Think We Are’.

I also really enjoy reading about people at work and apart from some chicklit and a few crime novels, I haven’t come across a lot of stories set in offices, so I’ve had to write my own. I’d be interested to know of any fantasy or horror stories set in offices.

9781907737992-Perfect.inddLord of the Looking Glass Cover
by Danielle Lainton

IP: Your stories of a post-apocalyptic world are vivid and strange. How did this world make itself known to you, and what are your plans for it in the future? Could you tell us about your favourite characters in this world?

FM: I’m not sure where this world came from. I suppose it might have come out of what I was reading at the time that I started to conceive of it – the Wraeththu books, Elizabeth Hand’s ‘Winterlong’ and ‘The Stand’ by Stephen King. I was at school during the Cold War and in English lessons we were studying works with a Cold War theme – novels, poetry and short stories and we watched the film ‘Threads’ in class. I don’t remember being very interested in the bomb blast, but in what would happen in the centuries afterwards when there was nothing left but ruins of our world.

I do have plans to write more about this world. The world of ‘The Census-Taker’s Daughter’ appeals to me a lot and I’d quite like to expand this short story into a novel length piece of writing. I’d keep the Sleeping Beauty theme and the talking animals and include the back story around what happened to Maya’s mother. The idea of there only being a finite number of people left in the only inhabitable place in the world, and then an extra person being half glimpsed in the shadows, really interests me.

I’ve also got an idea for a portal fantasy where several cities are interlinked and where one of these is a post-apocalyptic city. I’ve started sketching out a few ideas in a notebook, but it’s a slow progress.

IP: Are the stories of the Blood twins associated with the same world as that of the Walking Man?

Originally, they were, along with the ‘Ginevra Flowerdew’ and ‘The Plague Doctor’ stories. I wrote the stories to try and get some ideas of this world clear in my mind.

The Walking Man is a character/concept that particularly interests me – I’m not sure if I’ve ‘borrowed’ him from a film or a book, I have a niggling feeling in the back of my mind that something inspired him, but I can’t remember what. The idea of a stranger just walking and walking and not actually going anywhere but creating his own mythology along the way appeals to me. I have an idea for a novel that mixes the vampire from ‘Cosmic Ordering for Vampires’ with the Walking Man that really excites me, but I think it’s probably unpublishable.

I’d also like to write some more about the Blood twins, and I can see that having them encounter the Walking Man in one of his many incarnations might be interesting.

IP: How many of your stories are inspired by events and people in real life, and are there any anecdotes you can share about them?

FM: The bridge in ‘Bridge 52’ is a real place in Milton Keynes which is apparently haunted by an Irish labourer who was murdered, and his remains walled up in the supports.

I was part of a lottery syndicate until quite recently and we rarely won anything, and I got the idea for ‘The Lottery Lady’ from that. The mortgage fraud in that story is a little like the fraud I thought I’d worked out how to carry out, and when I was working in that same team, a colleague and I found a staircase in the building we’d never noticed before one day, despite having worked the building for years. All that found its way into ‘The Lottery Lady’.

There are elements of someone I used to know in the character of Terz in ‘A Dream and a Lie’ – the idea that you can get away with doing something despicable if you can make people laugh and you’re fun to be around.

IP: You’re currently working on a revised edition of your trilogy ‘A Dream and a Lie’. Could you talk about how you’ve felt coming back to those novels after quite a long time away from them?

FM: I had mixed feelings about revisiting it. My initial feeling was that it was written and done with and I wasn’t particularly interested in looking at it again, but when I flicked through it, I could see that there were still parts of it that excited me even though it’s probably not what I would write now if I was starting a fantasy novel from scratch.

What surprises me now is the hugeness of the world I created and the sheer number of characters. I didn’t have any plan when I started writing it – I just wrote it without any idea of where it was going. I don’t think I intended on writing something so epic when I started it. The first three or four drafts were hand written and there were a lot of characters (Traize, Nym, Nightshade) who were late additions. Every time I added a new character, I had to start rewriting again at the beginning to weave their story into the plot. Revisiting it now, I can remember those first drafts and how I began to slowly realise I was writing something that might actually go somewhere.

One thing that’s struck me on revising it is the lack of strong female characters in the original, so I’m trying to address that. The beauty of having a shape-shifting, gender-fluid race of people is that this isn’t as problematic as it might be though it hasn’t been as simple as just changing ‘he’ to ‘she’. What’s struck me is how something like changing the gender of characters can change the whole feel of certain scenes. I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but there’s one particular thing that has a completely different feel and much more interesting slant to it when the gender of one of the characters is changed from male to female.

I’ve enjoyed revisiting it and I’m glad I’m doing it. I love it when I come across something that I’d forgotten I’d written, or a description or turn of phrase that surprises me and I find myself thinking ‘Wow, I wrote that’.

IP: What unfinished works and ideas do you have awaiting further development?

FM: Lots of ideas, some that I’ve already mentioned – a vampire/walking man novel; an expanded version of ‘The Census Taker’s Daughter’ and the portal novel I mentioned. I’ve got a crime type novel that I wrote at the same time I was developing A Dream and A Lie that I’d like to do something with and an angels and demons novel that I wrote and have some plans for. I’d also quite like to revisit the world of A Dream and a Lie and write a bit more about what happens next to some of the characters. I started doing this a few years ago but rather infuriatingly I can’t find the file.

IP: What is the strangest/weirdest thing that has ever happened to you?

FM: When I was very little, maybe 3 or 4 years old, I was in the garden with my Dad and there was something grey and metallic in the sky that only I could see. I can see it very clearly in my memory – it looked a bit like a sideways metal pyramid. I pointed at it and asked what it was, but my Dad couldn’t see anything. Strangely, I’ve never given this much thought or questioned what it was or if I just imagined it.

Generally, nothing particularly odd has happened to me – I think I write strange fiction to fill that gap.

IP: Please give details of all social media you’re involved in, so that people can keep up to date with your work.

FM: I’ve got a Facebook page and a Facebook author page that I’ll endeavour to keep up to date. I also have a website at fionamcgavin.co.uk where I’m keeping a weekly blog about my reading, writing and other stuff that interests me. I’ve also got a Good Reads author page.

PRE-ORDERING FOR ‘SHE: PRIMAL MEETINGS WITH THE DARK GODDESS’

We’re now taking pre-orders for the Collector’s Edition of SHE: Primal Meetings with the Dark Goddess by Storm Constantine and Andrew Collins, with contributions by Deborah Cartwright, Maggie Jennings, Richard Ward and Caroline Wise, released on 13th December 2018. This unique edition of the book, limited to just 99 copies, retails at £29.99 plus shipping. Please use the link to our web site below to order, which will calculate the shipping cost to your address.

9781912241071

The Collector’s Edition of SHE is hardback with a wraparound cover featuring artwork by Danielle Lainton. It includes a numbered signature page, a bonus section ‘Goddesses of Greater Darkness’, exploring a further three goddesses (Lyssa, Melinoë and Kalma) and extra illustrations.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING IMPORTANT POINTS:

Visit our web site Immanion Press to pre-order your copy.

Pre-ordering secures you a copy of the book, numbered, and signed by Andrew Collins and Storm Constantine. We will confirm we have received your order by email.

The book will not be dispatched until publication day, 13th December 2018. Orders will be shipped from the UK.

As this date falls near to the Christmas period, please bear in mind that parcels might take longer to arrive than usual, especially to addresses overseas.

All parcels will be shipped with full tracking and the requirement that they are signed for upon delivery.

Please submit your pre-order by 19th November 2018 to ensure we’re able to ship it in time.

Should the Collector’s Edition of SHE still be available following its publication on December 13, orders received and dispatched after this time might, for logistical reasons, only be signed by one of the co-authors, Storm Constantine.

Cover Text of SHE

The Dark Goddess is fearsome, lustful, unpredictable, dispassionate, cruel, and often deadly. She is Mother Nature without mercy. She is the Ice Maiden with no heart. She is the Bloody Scavenger of the Battlefield and the Huntress of the Moon. She is the Queen of the Dead, and the Avatar of Madness. She reflects our deepest desires, fears, ideals, hopes and expectations.

In this book, you’ll meet goddesses of war, ecstasy and chaos, as well as huntresses of the night and queens of the underworld. You’ll experience meetings with dark mothers, alluring demonesses and grim hags of the winter twilight, who might share with you their ancient wisdom. In vividly evoked timeless lands you’ll encounter powerful sorceresses and wild incarnations of delirium. Hecate, Ereshkigal, Babalon, Akhlys, Melusine, Berchta, Ashina, Black Annis, Lamia… they and all their shadowy sisters wait in their hidden domains to reveal their mysteries.

Storm Constantine and Andrew Collins have selected a wide and fascinating assembly of goddesses for this book, including some who are not so well-known. The pathworkings to meet them, and explore their realms through meditation and intuition, will help you gain insight into these often-misunderstood deities.

This fully-illustrated book includes articles and pathworkings by Deborah Cartwright, Maggie Jennings, Richard Ward and Caroline Wise. Illustrations by Danielle Lainton, Storm Constantine and Ruby. Cover art and design by Danielle Lainton.

The Collector’s edition is augmented by a bonus section – Goddesses of Greater Darkness – featuring Lyssa, Melinoë and Kalma, with extra illustrations to accompany it.

SHE: Primal Meetings with the Dark Goddess paperback edition

9781912241064

We’ll also be releasing a paperback edition of SHE on 13th December with cover artwork by Brom. This is available from our web site and online stores such as Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Para Kindred Authors on Writing and Wraeththu

Over the past week, Para Kindred: Enigmas of Wraeththu contributor Nerine Dorman has been generous enough host other anthology contributors on her blog This Is My World. So far five posts have appeared, each one offering a glimpse into the inspiration for the various stories and also the writer’s connection to Wraeththu.

Authors (and editors) who’ve appeared so far, with links to their posts:

We expect a few more posts and will share here when those are up.

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