Bringing Race to the Table: Exploring Racism in the Pagan Community is now available

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I’m pleased to announce that our latest anthology: Bringing Race to the Table: Exploring Racism in the Pagan Community is now available for pre-order and will be published on January 23rd.

Bringing Race to the Table: Exploring Racism in the Pagan Community is an anthology which explores the topic of racism and how it shows up in the Pagan community, as well as what we can do to discuss it and bring it out in the open. Each section of the anthology explores different facets of racism and how the Pagan community respond to it. Section 1: People of Color’s experience with Racism shares candid stories of how people of color have experienced racism in both subtle and overt forms, as well as how they have handled it. Section 2 Historical/Mythological Racism focuses on how Racism has shown up in mythological and historical contexts, as well as how it continues to show up in counter cultures. The final section: Being an Ally focuses on sharing suggestions and ideas on how white people can be better allies to people of color and how to be more aware of racism in both the Pagan and mainstream communities.

With essays from Xochiquetzal Duit Odinsdottir, T. Thorn Coyle, Crystal Blanton, Clio Ajana, Erick Dupree, Amy Hale, Lilith Dorsey, Lasara Firefox Allen and many others, this anthology explores racism and offers opportunities for us to engage this topic and proactively work to change our communities for the better.

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Black Lives Matter

Black Lives matter

At Immanion Press, one of our missions is to support social justice causes in the Pagan community. This is one of the reasons we’ve published anthologies such as Shades of Faith, Shades of Ritual, Rooted in the Body Seeking the Soul, and will soon be publishing Bringing Race to the Table. In the wake of recent events where unarmed black people such as Eric Garner, Michael Brown, and Tamir Rice are murdered by White police officers, with no justice brought to the offenders, we reaffirm our social justice mission to continue to bring to light the issues that need to be discussed in the Pagan community and in the mainstream communities. We stand with our author Crystal Blanton, in support of her and her mission. We align ourselves with the statement Black Lives Matter and reaffirm our stance to support social justice causes that create equity for all, especially for marginalized and oppressed groups of people. We see you and we value you.

Why we think its important to publish controversial topics

 

In both our non-fiction and fiction lines up we publish books that address controversial social issues. The reason we publish these book is because we feel its important to address these issues head-on. We don’t want to bury our heads in the sand and we think our readers also don’t want to bury their heads in the sand. I’ve been told, on occasion, that someone is surprised we’d publish a book a given topic and my response to that is: “Why wouldn’t we publish that book?” Reading a book, any book, should challenge a person to think, and to act. It should make you uncomfortable or do something that prompts you to want to make a change in the world.

We love controversial topics because such topics get people talking. And speaking only for myself, I want people to talk. I want them to do more than talk, but talking is a good first step and that won’t happen if we aren’t willing to bring up the social issues that are uncomfortable, but are that uncomfortable precisely because we don’t face and acknowledge them for what they are.

Controversial topics are topics that some people want to ignore or pretend don’t exist. Not us! And not our readers! We know those topics exist and we want to bring them out into the light where they can be seen for what they are. We aren’t scared of those topics and in fact we think that by publishing them, our readers will be inspired to examine those issues as they show up in their own lives, while also giving the authors the chance to speak up and be heard. We want our authors to be heard. We want them to speak up, not just in the book, but on their blogs, in workshops and wherever they go because what they are saying NEEDS to be heard. And as publishers we support their need to be heard and want to encourage them in whatever way we can.

Controversy makes a book stand out. You might love it or hate it, but you have a response to it, and that’s a good thing because it means the book moved you. A book doesn’t really become a book until the reader responds to it…then the book has performed its function. Controversial topics move people and that’s what we want. We want our books to mean to something. We want our authors to feel like they have said something which has struck a chord with their readers and gotten something to happen.

We publish controversial topics because other publishers won’t do it. I have yet to see other publishers publish books on some of the topics we’ve published. Perhaps they will eventually, but we’d rather be at the forefront, helping much needed conversations come about now, rather than catching up later. By doing so we’re helping authors speak out and get heard and helping readers learn more about the issues that need to be addressed now.

Rooted in the Body, Seeking the Soul now available from Immanion Press!

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Immanion Press is pleased to announce the release of Rooted in the Body, Seeking the Soul, our latest anthology, edited by Tara Miller

One purpose of this anthology is to help people find comfort in the fact that they are not alone. Some of the authors turned to a magical practice as a way to find healing and the anthology includes rituals and stories about healing. Covens, circles, temples or any other type of magical group can use it as a resource toward understanding members or potential members with disabilities. There are interviews with professional counselors, such as Drake Spaeth, about assisting Pagans and magic practitioners that’s useful to anyone in the medical profession.

Editor Tara “Masery” Miller is a Gaian Neo-Pagan who has been practicing for eighteen years. She has a minor in Religion with a focus on mysticism from Southeast Missouri State University. Masery has Turner’s Mosaic, which caused a collapse of her endocrine system. She lives in the Missouri Ozarks with her husband Michael.

Call for Writers– Bringing Race to the Table: An Exploration of Racism in the Pagan Community

Email for inquiries and submissionsCrystal Blanton

Megalithica Books, an imprint of Immanion Press (Stafford, U.K./Portland, OR, U.S.A) is seeking submissions for the Bring Race to the Table: An Exploration of Racism in the Pagan Community.

This anthology explores the topic of Racism and how Racism shows up in the Pagan community, as well as what we can do to recognize it and proactively work to change it by being consciously aware of race and privilege and actively applying that awareness to the Pagan community. We also examine cultural appropriation and its role in racism, and how we can approach issues of culture with conscious awareness that leads to genuine cultural exchanges instead of appropriation.

The vision for this anthology is to include a combination of academic and personally inspired pieces that show the experiences of racism, and the study of racism.

Here are some suggested topics to give you an idea of the focus of this anthology:

  • Your experience of racism and how it has impacted your ability to integrate into the Pagan community
  • Cultural Appropriation versus Cultural Exchange
  • How to recognize and confront Racism in your spiritual community.
  • Being an ally within the Pagan community for people of color.
  • Intersectionality of privilege, or examples of this within the community.
  • Experiences of a lack of cultural empathy, or sensitivity within Pagan groups, and how that impacts safe place for ethnic minorities.
  • Understanding how symbolism within Paganism reinforces racism and separation of diversity within Pagan groups.
  • Is preserving the lineage of hereditary practices and/or cultures racist? When is it not racist and what defines inclusion or exclusion in such cases?
  • How white power gangs are trying to infiltrate the Pagan community?
  • Definitions, understanding or experiences of symbolic, adversive, or systemic racism within the Pagan community.
  • Stereotypes and prejudice and the impact on spiritual or magic workings.
    Being the only person of color in a coven, group or community
  • Being a person of color at a pagan convention (and how convention organizers can be more conscious of this).
  • How Racism harms the Pagan Community, and how it shows up in the Pagan Community
  • How, as a community and as individuals, can we increase awareness of potentially harmful racial dynamics and proactively work to engage positive change.  
  • What is equity and how does it show up in the Pagan Community practically (what are examples of how equity has been or can be applied to the Pagan community)

Rough drafts are due March 15, 2014. These drafts will be edited in a back-and-forth process with the editors. Essays should be 1500-4000 words, although if your work falls outside those limits, do submit it – we can discuss this during the editing process. Drop us an email if you are unsure whether your idea fits into the content. The sooner you start the communication process the better, as after the deadline we won’t be considering additional ideas.

Essay requirements:

• Citations for all quoted, paraphrased, or otherwise unoriginal material
• Bibliography of works cited
• Prefer APA format

Write in your voice! If you’re academically inclined or trained, feel free to be as intelligent and technical as you like. If your work entirely talks in the first person about your own experience, please include this also. There is a wide range of voices, and we are interested in being as inclusive of style as possible.

Accepted contributors will receive a free copy of the anthology when it is published and additional copies sold at 40% off the cover price to contributors. All contributors will be provided with a contract upon final acceptance of their essays, not when they are accepted for editing. If your essay is not accepted for the anthology, we will tell you after the first round of edits.

The anthology will be edited by Crystal Blanton, Brandy Williams, and Taylor Ellwood. Crystal is the author of two books with Immanion press; Bridging the Gap; Working Within the Dynamics of Pagan Groups and Society, and Pain and Faith in a Wiccan World.  She is also the editor of the first anthology, Shades of Faith; Minority Voices in Paganism, and the forthcoming anthology, Shades of Ritual; Minority Voices in Practice. She may be found online at http://www.crystalblanton.org and her email address for this anthology is crystal@crystalblanton.com .

Brandy Williams is the author of Ecstatic Ritual (published by Immanion Press), Practical Magic for Beginners and The Woman Magician (published by Llewellyn) as well as the editor of Women’s Voices in Magic (published by Immanion Press). She may be found online at http://www.brandywilliams.org

Taylor Ellwood is the author of Pop Culture Magick, Magical Identity, and other books on magic. He is also the managing non-fiction editor of Immanion Press. He can be found online at http://www.magicalexperiments.com

Immanion Press is a small independent press based in the United Kingdom. Founded by author Storm Constantine, it expanded into occult nonfiction in 2004 with the publication of Taylor Ellwood’s Pop Culture Magick. Today, Immanion’s nonfiction line, under the Megalithica Books imprint, has a growing reputation for edgy, experimental texts on primarily intermediate and advanced pagan and occult topics. Find out more at http://www.immanion-press.com.